1928 Mouldings of the Wren & Georgian Periods, 1st edition - For Sale

1928 Mouldings of the Wren & Georgian Periods, 1st edition
Price: $85.00
A Portfolio of full-size Sections
FIRST EDITION ( Undated 1928)
By Tunstall Small & Christopher Woodbridge
Published by The Architectural Press, Nine Queen Annes' Gate, Westminster, London.

LARGE PORTFOLIO WITH PAPER COVERED BOARDS with RIBBON TIE - Spine is broken, pages are loose, needs rebinding or handle with care. All pages are in tact, overall, this book is rated in fair condition.( please view pictures for accuracy, or, email us for more information )

SUBJECTS COVERED ARE:- WREN PERIOD ( 1660-1720) Skirtings - Dado Moulds - Stair Nosings - Panel Moulds - Architraves - Window Seat Nosings - Interior Door Panel Moulds - Door Panel Moulds Exterior - Fireplace Surrounds - Handrails -

GEORGIAN PERIOD ( 1720 - 1750 ) Skirtings - Door Panel Moulds Interior - Dado Moulds - Architraves - Panel Moulds - Handrails - Stair Nosings - Door Panel Moulds Exterior -

WREN & GEORGIAN PERIODS Cornices - Window Architraves Exterior - Sash Bars.

INTERESTINGLY THE INDEX GIVES DETAILED INFORMATION OF NAMED HOUSES, MANSIONS, & PALACES WHERE THE NOTES AND REFERENCES FOR THE INDIVIDUAL MOULDINGS WERE ACCESSED. ie..

No. 1 Newcastle House, Lewes.

No. 2 Chapter House, St. Pauls Cathedral

No. 3 Deaf and Dumb Asylum, Clapton

THIS IS A SCARCE FIRST EDITION
SOME INFO:-
TOWARDS the end of the first quarter of the 18th century the Renaissance style, as thoroughly nationalised by Wren, began to decline in favour of a more purely Italian classical style. Wren differed chiefly from Inigo Jones in that his work bore a far more homely character. With the opening of the century he was still the leading architect from whom the lesser designers took their pattern. He died in 1723, but before his death his influence had declined, and popular fashion reverted to the colder and more formal style favoured by Jones.
The reversion was probably not so much due to any remaining influence of Jones, as to the rising fashion for people to whom building was of immediate interest to travel abroad. They learnt for themselves the origin whence the Renaissance had come, and the stately, spacious style they found appealed irresistibly to the age. It demanded all that was elegant, magnificent, and pompous at no matter what sacrifice of comfort. Noble-men required splendid houses, and the number of smaller houses suited to the purses of the country squires and the well-to-do commercial classes increased steadily. Private individuals became versed in the principles of classic architecture, and their acquaintanceship with the Italian buildings caused a reaction in favour of the style set by Inigo Jones in the previous century, which lent itself readily to the fashionable ideas of the times.
Many of the architects during the second half of the 17th century had never been abroad, and had absorbed their ideas of the Renaissance from men like Jones and Pratt. It was natural that with their ideas thus limited they should retain a good deal of what was traditionally English. Wren, although his work owed its origin to Italy, adapted the style to suit our colder climate, and gave to his interiors a far greater sense of homeliness than had been customary with Jones. In the first half of the 18th century all the leading architects, or at any rate all the fashionable architects, travelled abroad, and came back inspired with ideas purely Italian in feeling.
The result of the rage for the Italian ideal was a great increase in the proportions of the rooms. The hall enjoyed a period of importance, and although it was essentially an entrance place and in no sense a living-room, it was the subject of the most elaborate treatment. In many cases it assumed a degree of spaciousness and immensity that remind one of a Roman palace. The great height to which it was built often caused the addition of a gallery. It became customary to build the ground-floor, in which the hall was situated, somewhat above the level of the ground, the outer entrance being approached by a flight of steps. The basement below was used for the kitchens and other offices.

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Virginia-23220
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